Browsing the blog archives for July, 2005

Genius: The Life and Science of Richard Feynman, James Gleick

The dis-oriented author first came across Nobel laureate Richard Feynman when my bother-in-law gave me copies of Feynman’s books, "Surely You’re Joking Mr. Feynman": Adventures of a Curious Character and What do You Care What Other People Think?: Further Adventures of a Curious Character. Feynman was a Physicist who worked on the Manhattan Project and [...]

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Alan Turing: The Enigma, Andrew Hodges

The dis-oriented author first came across Alan Turing during my childhood while reading about codes and codebreakers. I encountered Turing again in college when I took a class in Automata Theory. It should be no surprise that I purchased a copy of Andrew Hodges’ Alan Turing: The Enigma. Turing was a British mathematician who was [...]

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Isaac Newton, James Gleick

At 272 pages, Isaac Newton by James Gleick is not a large book. The dis-oriented author, having a degree in mathematics and being generally interested in history, found this book irresistable. I read Gleick’s excellent Chaos when it first came out in 1987 and I have his Feynman biography, Genius on my desk to read [...]

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Last Stand of the Tin Can Sailors, James D. Hornfischer

The dis-oriented author is a history buff. Since my mother lived under Japanese occupation during WWII on Guam I find myself drawn to the Pacific War. It was therefore onevtiable that I would pick up James D. Hornfischer’s Last Stand of the Tin Can Sailors. This book tells the story of the naval battle of [...]

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Shadow Divers, Robert Kurson

The disoriented author is a SCUBA diver and a history buff so it is natural that I would gravitate towards a book like  Shadow Divers by Robert Kurson. Shadow Divers is the true story of a group of divers who discover a previously unknown German U-Boat off the coast of New Jersey. Their initial attempts [...]

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